Greg Fallis

Measuring the Concept of Trump Fatigue

It’s safe to say that the concept of Trump fatigue has set in across the globe. We’re all tired of calling him out, but I don’t think we should quit – we need a break.

 

Trump fatigue. It’s been a couple of weeks since I posted anything on him, and it’s due entirely to Trump fatigue. I don’t want to write about Comrade Trump. Or anything to do with Trump. Or the Trump administration. I’m sick of writing about Trump. There are so many other things I’d like to write about.

But the horrifying fact is this: Trump and his supporters are destroying democracy. That sounds so melodramatic, but nonetheless, it’s true. I don’t want to write about Trump, but there’s nothing as important as the erosion of democratic norms and the corruption of democratic institutions.

 

Trump

 

I watched Attorney General William Barr’s attempt to lie and harrumph his way through the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing. There was a moment that seemed to me to be the distillation of everything Trump. In response to a question, Barr said this:

“The point I was trying to make earlier is that in this situation of the president who has constitutional authority to supervise proceedings: if in fact the proceeding was not well founded, if it was a groundless proceeding, if it was based on false allegations, the president does not have to sit there constitutionally and allow it to run its course. The president could terminate the proceeding and it would not be a corrupt intent because he was being falsely accused, and he would be worried about the impact on his administration.”

In other words, Barr is claiming that if the president decides an investigation into his behavior isn’t really justified, he can end it. That’s a shocking opinion from a person who is supposed to be the nation’s chief law enforcement official. If other AGs had held Barr’s position, Nixon could have said, “Watergate? Nope, wasn’t me. Shut down that investigation,” and skated through the rest of his term. Bill Clinton could have said, “Nope, this Whitewater investigation is bullshit, so, shut down that investigation,” and today nobody would be familiar with the name Monica Lewinsky.

It’s obvious that presidents need to be accountable for their actions. Even presidents we like. But we find ourselves, for the first time in the history of the United States, in a situation where the institutions created and designed to hold the president accountable have actually been corrupted by the president. We can’t rely on the Supreme Court, we can’t rely on the Republicans in Congress, and we can’t rely on the Attorney General. All we can do is resist and encourage the Democrats in the House of Representatives to do what they can to check the president.

 

Trump

 

I don’t want to write about William Barr. I don’t want to write about Mitch McConnell, or Justice Brett Kavanaugh, or Comrade Donald Goddamn Trump. I don’t even want to think about these corrupt motherfuckers. But we pretty much have to think about them. And talk about them. And resist them.

It doesn’t mean we can’t think about the Game of Thrones or the photography of Garry Winogrand or the novels of Dorothy Dunnett or morel hunting or any of the thousands of things that interest us. It doesn’t mean we can’t enjoy all those things. In fact, we should give in to the temptation to enjoy those things even more—because right now we need to find things to enjoy. We should enjoy the hell out of them, if only as an antidote to Trump Fatigue.

But then we need to get back to the business of resistance.

 

Greg Fallis

I’ve been around the block a couple of times. I’ve been a medic in the military, a counselor in the Psychiatric/Security unit of a prison for women, and a private investigator specializing in criminal defense. I’ve picked up a few degrees and taught various courses in criminology and sociology at The American University in Washington, D.C. and at Fordham University in New York City. Now, I’m primarily a writer and photographer. I’m the managing editor of Utata.org, an international collective of photographers engaged in a variety of ongoing projects. I teach advanced workshops in Mystery Writing for the Gotham Writers’ Workshop. Like I said, I’ve been around the block a couple of times. It’s a good block; I expect I’ll keep going around it for a while.

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